Irish Shooting Politics

March 29, 2009

On the accuracy of minutes

Filed under: Politics — Mark Dennehy @ 9:02 pm

Minutes are a surprisingly overlooked part of any organisation on a day-to-day basis. It has to be noted, however, that their importance is unaffected by this general status of being taken for granted. The accuracy and veracity of minutes is a rock which can act as foundation for a successful venture, or as a reef for the unwary keel of a doomed enterprise.

With this in mind, I note several errors and a general lack of accurate representation in the recently released minutes of the meeting in Abbeyleix. Regretabbly, I cannot lay claim to shock or surprise in this, my nature having been invested with significant cynicism regarding the secretary of these minutes some time ago.

I would point out, however, that a serious injustice has been done to the postive message brought to the floor of that meeting by Joe Costello of the SSAI, that the breadth and depth of the information he provided there has been woefully misrepresented, and that the depth of knowlege of the Firearms Acts and the process of the law and legislative process in general that was displayed by those present at the top table (with the sole exemption of Ms.Walsh, who wisely refrained from giving legal opinion or advice in such a venue, much to her professional credit) was substantially exaggerated in these published minutes of the meeting.

It is said that history is written by the victors; I fear that this maxim has become outdated, for now it seems that those who write history are no longer chosen by success, and this requires the reader to exercise even more discretion with regard to his or her sources of information; and this may mean that the status of the minutes of an organisation may now have reverted to mere propaganda.

Perhaps we should all adopt the policy of utilising private audio recordings of important meetings, in order to double-check the veracity and accuracy of minutes.

Advertisements

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: